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VIDEO
Jan 30
6:41 pm
4 notes

In what ways did Pope Julius II affect the course of 16th century art?

- Julius II extended his quest for authority to temporal realm.

- AKA warrior-pope

- Avid art patron

- After he became pope he immediately commissioned artworks presenting authoritative image of his rule

Most important:

1. The new design for St. Peter’s basilica

    The basilica was a symbolic seat of the papacy and represented the Church history

     He chose Bramante to do it and he included many High Renaissance elements such as the central- plan church

2.  Julius II commissioned Michelangelo to paint the Sistine Chapel, even though that was not his strong suit.

             3.  The building of his tomb by Michelangelo

                 It was a colossal monument that was supposed to include numerous statues; however, once he started St. Peter’s the commission went to that instead. When Julius II died Michelangelo was forced to complete it on a much smaller scale.

-He commissioned Michelangelo and with his fascination of the human body he created David, which Julius II really liked, because he was a humanist as well.


POST
Jan 21
2:53 am
5 notes
Raphael, 	Marriage of the 	Virgin,1504.Oil on wood, 67”x46 ½”.Pinacoteca di Brera, Milan.

Notes:
Raphael was a student of Perugino. This work is similar to Perugino’s Christ Delivering the Keys of the Kingdom to St. Peter. 
Marriage of the Virgin was painted for the Chapel of St. Joseph. The story depicted isn’t in the Bible, but rather the Golden Legend (an assortment of stories about the saints). Here, Joseph is competing against other suitors for Mary’s hand in marriage. 
The suitor breaking his rod over his knee is created by a foreshortening technique.
The building in the background is like that of Bramante’s Tempietto, a centrally planned structure. However, the building in the painting incorporates arcades that are more Brunnelleschian than the Bramante’s.

Raphael, Marriage of the Virgin,1504.
Oil on wood, 67”x46 ½”.
Pinacoteca di Brera, Milan.

Notes:

Raphael was a student of Perugino. This work is similar to Perugino’s Christ Delivering the Keys of the Kingdom to St. Peter. 

Marriage of the Virgin was painted for the Chapel of St. Joseph. The story depicted isn’t in the Bible, but rather the Golden Legend (an assortment of stories about the saints). Here, Joseph is competing against other suitors for Mary’s hand in marriage.

The suitor breaking his rod over his knee is created by a foreshortening technique.

The building in the background is like that of Bramante’s Tempietto, a centrally planned structure. However, the building in the painting incorporates arcades that are more Brunnelleschian than the Bramante’s.


PHOTO
Jan 18
10:03 pm
5 notes
stillwaitingforgodot:

Isn’t she lovely?
Michelangelo’s Pieta: 
 Pieta is any depiction of a grieving Mary holding the body of a crucified Jesus
 Literally means the pity
 Began in 1499 and took 2  years to complete. Commissioned for the tomb in St. Peters of the French  cardinal. Upon its completion the world declared that Michelangelo’s  Pieta ‘surpassed not only the sculptures of his contemporaries but even  those of the ancient Greeks and Romans themselves; the standards by  which all art was judged.’
 Like most of his sculptures, the marble block was hand chosen by Michelangelo
 One of Michelangelo’s most famous works; the only one ever signed

stillwaitingforgodot:

Isn’t she lovely?

Michelangelo’s Pieta:

  •  Pieta is any depiction of a grieving Mary holding the body of a crucified Jesus
  •  Literally means the pity
  •  Began in 1499 and took 2 years to complete. Commissioned for the tomb in St. Peters of the French cardinal. Upon its completion the world declared that Michelangelo’s Pieta ‘surpassed not only the sculptures of his contemporaries but even those of the ancient Greeks and Romans themselves; the standards by which all art was judged.’

 Like most of his sculptures, the marble block was hand chosen by Michelangelo

 One of Michelangelo’s most famous works; the only one ever signed

(Source: stopwaitingforgodot, via arthistoryx)


PHOTO
Jan 18
9:18 pm
18 notes
Rosso 	Fiorentino, Moses 	Defending the Daughters of Jethro,1523, Oil on Canvas, approx. 63’ x  46 ½”


Notes:
Rosso Fiorentino was a pupil of Andrea del Sarto
Compressed space in the painting leads to turbulent action
Figures muscular like Michelangelo’s figures on the Sistine Chapel, though his figures are less expressive and more imaginative with athletic poses.
Foreshortened figures in the front move us into the picture.

Rosso Fiorentino, Moses Defending the Daughters of Jethro,
1523, Oil on Canvas, approx. 63’ x 46 ½”

Notes:

Rosso Fiorentino was a pupil of Andrea del Sarto

Compressed space in the painting leads to turbulent action

Figures muscular like Michelangelo’s figures on the Sistine Chapel, though his figures are less expressive and more imaginative with athletic poses.

Foreshortened figures in the front move us into the picture.


PHOTO
Jan 10
10:49 pm
4 notes
Pontormo, 	Descent from the 	Cross, 1525-1528.Oil on wood, approx. 10’ 3” x 6’ 6”.Capponi chapel, Santa Felicita, Florence.

Notes: 
Pontormo was a student of Andrea del Sarto
Painting is ambiguous and unusual; uses high key colors (like Fra Angelico)
Void in center of painting (break from High Renaissance artists); no illusion of space
Heads small; bodies elongated

Pontormo, Descent from the Cross, 1525-1528.
Oil on wood, approx. 10’ 3” x 6’ 6”.
Capponi chapel, Santa Felicita, Florence.

Notes: 

Pontormo was a student of Andrea del Sarto

Painting is ambiguous and unusual; uses high key colors (like Fra Angelico)

Void in center of painting (break from High Renaissance artists); no illusion of space

Heads small; bodies elongated



PHOTO
Jan 10
7:47 pm
14 notes

Mannerism 1520-1600

Basic features of Mannerism: 

  • elongated figures
  • Figura serpentinata 
  • less emphasis on balance, symmetry, and rational composition (values of High Renaissance)
  • unusual lighting effects 

POST
Jan 10
7:36 pm
2 notes
Santa Maria della Consolazione, Todi, begun 1508 (view from the south)

Notes: 
Has High Renaissance Classical ideals: order, clarity, lucidity, simplicity, harmony, and proportion. 
Domed cross, lobelike arms end in polygonal apses, balanced and symmetrical

Santa Maria della Consolazione, Todi, begun 1508 (view from the south)

Notes: 

Has High Renaissance Classical ideals: order, clarity, lucidity, simplicity, harmony, and proportion. 

Domed cross, lobelike arms end in polygonal apses, balanced and symmetrical


PHOTO
Jan 5
10:39 pm
11 notes
Christoforo 	Foppa Caradosso, 	medal showing Bramante’s design for the new Saint Peter’s, 1506. 	Bronze, 2 1/4” diameter. British Museum, London.

Notes: 
Commemoration of Bramante’s design for the new St. Peter’s
Importance of coin: It brought back an ancient Roman custom - the marking of monumental imperial building projects on the reverses of Roman coins

Christoforo Foppa Caradosso, medal showing Bramante’s design for the new Saint Peter’s, 1506. Bronze, 2 1/4” diameter. British Museum, London.

Notes: 

Commemoration of Bramante’s design for the new St. Peter’s

Importance of coin: It brought back an ancient Roman custom - the marking of monumental imperial building projects on the reverses of Roman coins


PHOTO
Jan 5
10:16 pm
2 notes
Bramante, Tempietto, 	1502 .  San Pietro in Montorio, Rome.
Notes:Stylistic differences of Early and High Renaissance architecture:
Early-emphasis on articulation of flat wall surfaces
High-sculptural handling of architectural masses
Centralized plan
Included doric columns and a balustrade - a railing held up by small posts, as on a staircase.
Not in the style of Brunelleschi; fashion changed to post and lintel 

Bramante, Tempietto, 1502 . San Pietro in Montorio, Rome.

Notes:
Stylistic differences of Early and High Renaissance architecture:

  • Early-emphasis on articulation of flat wall surfaces
  • High-sculptural handling of architectural masses

Centralized plan

Included doric columns and a balustrade - a railing held up by small posts, as on a staircase.

Not in the style of Brunelleschi; fashion changed to post and lintel 



PHOTO
Jan 5
9:56 pm
5 notes

Art History

This blog exists as a study tool for the Art History AP. I'll be posting my notes from class when I get a chance to. Feel free to submit/message me with notes if you want.